Commentary

Tue
15
Aug

Hate

By Shirley Todd

Over the weekend I was trying to think of something to write my column over. I was thinking about back to school when I remembered someone had posted something about, since it was time for school; teach your kids about bullying.

What a great reminder. Teach our kids not to bully others for the way a child looks or behaves. Or if your child is being bullied, make sure it is reported. Parents, if you don’t think enough is being done to help your child, then do something.

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Thu
10
Aug

Cowboy Bill Picket

By Bunny Baker

One of the surest ways to get work in the days of the Wild West shows was to invent a new act. That’s how the career of Bill Picket, a black Choctaw cowboy from Texas, got started.

Pickett invented what became the rodeo event of bulldogging. His style, however, was different even by the standards of the times. As described by Zack Miller of the 101 Ranch in “The 101 Ranch” by Ellsworth Collings, Pickett “slid off a horse, hooked a steer with both hands on the horns, twisted its neck and sunk his teeth in the steer’s nostrils to bring him down.”

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Thu
10
Aug

Farewell

By Kalyeigh Thesenvitz

I put close to 4,000 miles on my poor old car this summer driving from Tulsa to Bristow every day, and I barely made enough to afford the gas, but I’ve got to say the experience alone was worth every mile.

The people of Bristow are a lot like the people of my own home town, compassionate of course, but also stubborn to a fault and quick to react to the slightest perceived injustice.

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Wed
09
Aug

Letters to the Editor

Dear Editor

This past school year I received the Oklahoma Coaches Association Region 2 Junior High Coach of the Year Award. This award is in the hands of the wrong person. This award should go to all the parents who supported the boys in what they accomplished. This award should go to the administration and coaching staff at Bristow Junior and Senior High for entrusting their young men to my care. And, last but not least, this award really should be in the hands of all those tremendous eighth and ninth grade athletes who learned to trust in what I was telling and giving them and who grew to trust in one another and put feet on my words and wishes. This award is in no way indicative of one man's work. It has everything to do with what those three entities can do working together inside the Bristow Schools Community.

Thank you
Sincerely,
Eric Schultz

Wed
09
Aug

Helping things grow

By Shirley Todd

Nothing is more satisfying than to watch something grow that you have been a part of since the seed was planted.

You plant either flower or vegetable seeds; you water, feed and nurture the seed until it grows to its full capacity.

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Thu
03
Aug

Paper cuts

by J. D. Meisner

I read some disturbing news this week that the twice-weekly newspaper where I first cut my journalistic teeth was shutting down for good. The owners of the Cibola County Beacon, in Grants, New Mexico, announced Monday that it's last issue would be published this week; then it would be no more.

This news sent me on a trip down memory lane, recalling all the people I met who touched my life and the stories I wrote that hopefully touched some of the people who read the Beacon.

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Tue
01
Aug

Memories

By Shirley Todd

I took a trip down memory lane this past weekend, looking through old pictures. I came to the realization either my mom was a bad photographer or we had a terrible camera. Nevertheless, she took a lot of pictures. Maybe due to the fact there weren’t a lot of pictures taken of her growing up, so she wanted to take a lot of pictures of us to document our lives from birth to adulthood.

I know the picture quality from the 1970s isn’t what it is today. I had to upload the pictures and adjust the color so I could figure out who the picture was of. It was great going through old pictures. It reminded me of the great childhood I had.

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Mon
31
Jul

Device helped tame traffic

By Bunny Baker

Garrett A. Morgan, of Cleveland, Ohio, witnessed a traffic accident between an automobile and a horse drawn carriage that knocked the automobile driver unconcious and resulted in the horse being put down. That led him to invent and, in 1923, a patent for the first affordable hand operated traffic signals. His t-shaped pole unit featured three positions for pedistrians to cross.

Morgan’s signal was used throughout North America until it was replaced by the red, yellow and green traffic lights currently used around the world. The inventor sold his rights to the traffic signal to General Electric Corporation for $40,000.00.

 

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Mon
31
Jul

Right is right

By J. D. Meisner

I took driver's education when I was 15 years old from a very large man whose name was Rick Tomlinson. Tomlinson insisted we call him “Mr. Rickety” (his version of Rick T. I guess, but the name Rickety crossed over to the cars he owned and operted to teach teenagers to drive).

To my best recollection, Mr. Rickety had an early 60s Black Ford Falcon that was literally covered in scrapes and dents, primarily because it was the vehicle he used to teach us how to parallel park.

He had a late 60s blue Dodge Dart four door with a column shift (three on the tree), manual transmission. This car was also used as a parallel parking crash subject. We also used it to drive through the simulated city road course he had laid out in the high school parking lot, complete with four-way stops, yields, and school zones.

 

Tue
25
Jul

Uncle George Clinton

By Bunny Baker

Death came to Uncle George Clinton, 95, the oldest member of the Euchee Indian tribe, early Sunday morning. He had made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Ida Riley, at 202 East Jefferson, for the past several years and was active and enjoyed good health until his death.

With his death another chapter in Oklahoma’s colorful territorial days is closed.

Born in 1857 near Haskell, the family moved closer to what is now the Bristow area. His boyhood was spent hunting and fishing and later he served five years as a member of the Lighthorsemen, a law enforcement organization.

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